Artificial Intelligence and Life in 2030

The Stanford One Hundred Year Study on Artificial Intelligence includes issues we should discuss.  For example, in their study they remind that “Currently in the United States, at least sixteen separate agencies govern sectors of the economy related to AI technologies. Rapid advances in AI research and, especially, its applications require experts in these sectors to develop new concepts and metaphors for law and policy. Who is responsible when a self-driven car crashes or an intelligent medical device fails? How can AI applications be prevented from promulgating racial discrimination or financial cheating? Who should reap the gains of efficiencies enabled by AI technologies and what protections should be afforded to people whose skills are rendered obsolete? As people integrate AI more broadly and deeply into industrial processes and consumer products, best practices need to be spread, and regulatory regimes adapted.”

Learn more from Artificial Intelligence and Life in 2030 —  One Hundred Year Study on Artificial Intelligence, Report of the 2015-2016 Study Panel, Stanford University, Stanford, CA,  September 2016. https://ai100.stanford.edu/2016-report

Ideas for the Next Administration

VentureBeat has a set of interesting articles including
Matt Bencke’s  suggestions about AI for the next administration. He says, “Every White House leadership change causes speculation about what pre-existing initiatives the incoming administration will embrace or eliminate. I encourage President-elect Trump and his appointees to start their term ready to ensure that artificial intelligence (AI) gives our economy the competitive edge it needs.”
Other contributions are on AI and healthcare, bot startups, and more.
Several issues are raised about AI policy.

 

Transition Matters

Some new resources are available to help with the transition to a new administration. We need to get involved for AI matters.

Insights into Trump Administration science policy: https://www.aaas.org/election-transition/trump-administration

Positions:
https://www.aaas.org/election-transition/positions-statements

Resources:
https://www.aaas.org/election-transition/science-community-resources

AAAS Editorial:
http://science.sciencemag.org/content/early/2016/11/16/science.aal4180

AI Matters in the New Administration

At the recent AAAI 2016 Fall Symposium, we heard from two experts on the future of technology and policy in the field of cognitive assistance in government and public sector applications. Mark Maybury, Chief Security Officer at Mitre, spoke about the unprecedented rapid changes in AI technology applications and the prospects for good and bad impacts on society. Edward Felton, Deputy U.S. CTO in the Office of the Chief Technology Officer, reviewed recent and current initiatives including the impact of AI and cognitive assistants. CTO “helps shape Federal policies, initiatives, and investments that support the OSTP mission, while also working to anticipate and guard against the consequences that can accompany new discoveries and technologies.”

The discussion about unprecedented opportunities and challenges for AI public policy were exciting, and the symposium was also in the aftermath of an unprecedented presidential election. While not explicitly raised at the symposium, the near future of AI technology and policy was on people’s minds. In that spirit, your comments and insights about AI matters and policy issues as the next administration is being assembled are most welcome!

As a reminder, our goal is to post AI & Policy information on the 1st and 15th of each month.

Policy Matters Posting for November 15, 2016: AAAS

AAAS Policy Issues and Events

In our survey of organizations related to AI & policy, this post reminds us of the potential opportunities to partner with the American Association for the Advancement of Science, particularly the Center of Science, Policy, and Society. While AAAS policy issues are usually not directly about AI, a regular look at their Policy Alert notifications is useful for larger policy issues and opportunities for SIGAI to be involved.

A recent event directly related to AI policy was the 41st Annual AAAS Forum on Science & Technology Policy. At the panel “Best Friend or Worst Nightmare? Autonomy and AI in the Lab and in Society,” AI professionals discussed the role of policy in integrating new technologies into people’s lives, particularly for autonomous systems.

Also keep in mind the AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellowships and encourage applications by AI professionals in the spectrum of career stages, from recent PhD graduates to faculty on sabbatical to retired scientists and engineers.

The 2016 Leadership Seminar is a Science & Technology Policy “crash course” being held this week. This and other policy events at AAAS may be useful for future participation by SIGAI members.

We welcome your comments to this blog and ideas sent to lrm@gwu.edu.

As a reminder, our goal is to post AI & Policy information on the 1st and 15th of each month.

Policy Matters at AAAI FSS-16

The AAAI Fall Symposium Series on November 17-19, 2016, comprises six symposia, all of which are relevant to AI public policy:
Accelerating Science: A Grand Challenge for AI
Artificial Intelligence for Human-Robot Interaction
Cognitive Assistance in Government and Public Sector Applications
Cross-Disciplinary Challenges for Autonomous Systems
Privacy and Language Technologies
Shared Autonomy in Research and Practice.

Themes include human-machine relationships and the need for stakeholders to be in dialogue about legal impacts and potential legislative actions. Public policy must address the encouragement or discouragement of short-term technology development goals, the longer-term implications of autonomous systems, and the increasing influence of AI on human activities.

Should the creators of autonomous systems be responsible for the actions of those systems?
Could autonomous systems gain personhood and legal responsibility?

We welcome your comments and perspectives!

If you are able to participate in FSS-16, we look forward to you giving your ideas and questions at the symposia. If you cannot attend, please let us know questions you would like asked by adding your comments and discussions in this blog posting. We also welcome your ideas sent to lrm@gwu.edu so they can be shared at FSS-16.

Public Policy Post

Welcome to our new AI public policy blog section!

News for October 27, 2016:

NSF yesterday released a statement in support of the National Artificial Intelligence Research and Development Strategic Plan.

Check out the National AI R&D Strategic Plan.

NSF released a “Dear Colleague” letter encouraging reproducibility in computing research.

Note that the USEC 2017 call for papers includes AI. The deadline is December 1.

Please contribute information about AI public policy issues to this blog. You may also send email to Larry Medsker at lrm@gwu.edu for posting.

Larry