Policy in the News

The Computing Community Consortium (CCC) announced a new initiative to create a Roadmap for Artificial Intelligence. SIGAI’s Yolanda Gil (University of Southern California and President-Elect of AAAI) will work with Bart Selman (Cornell University) to lead the effort. The initiative will support the U.S. Administrations’ efforts in this area and involve academic and industrial researchers to help map a course for needed research in AI. They will hold a series of workshops in 2018 and 2019 to produce the Roadmap by Spring of 2019. The Computing Research Association (CRA) has been involved in shaping public policy of relevance to computing research for more than two decades https://cra.org/govaffairs/blog/ The CRA Government Affairs program has enhanced its efforts to help the members of the computing research community contribute to the public debate knowledgeably and effectively.

Ed Felten, Princeton Professor of Computer Science and Public Affairs, has been confirmed by the U.S. Senate to be a member of the U.S. Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board, a bipartisan agency within the executive branch. He will serve as a part-time member of the board while continuing his teaching and research at Princeton. The five-person board is charged with evaluating and advising on executive branch anti-terrorism measures with respect to privacy and civil liberties. “It is a very important issue,” Felten said. “Federal agencies, in the course of doing national security work, have access to a lot of data about people and they do intercept data. It’s important to make sure they are doing those things in the way they should and not overstepping.” Felten added that the board has the authority to review programs that require secrecy. “The public has limited visibility into some of these programs,” Felten said. “The board’s job is to look out for the public interest.”

On October 24, 2018, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Forum on Aging, Disability, and Independence will host a workshop in Washington, DC that will explore the potential of artificial intelligence (AI) to foster a balance of safety and autonomy for older adults and people with disabilities who strive to live as independently as possible http://nationalacademies.org/hmd/Activities/Aging/AgingDisabilityForum/2018-OCT-24.aspx

According to Reuters, Amazon scrapped an AI recruiting tool that showed bias against women in automated employment screening.

ACM Code of Ethics and USACM’s New Name

ACM Code of Ethics
Please note the message from ACM Headquarters and check the link below: “On Tuesday, July 17, ACM plans to announce the updated Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct. We would like your support in helping to reach as broad an audience of computing professionals as possible with this news. When the updated Code goes live at 10 a.m. EDT on July 17, it will be hosted at https://www.acm.org/code-of-ethics.
We encourage you to share the updated Code with your friends and colleagues at that time. If you use social media, please take part in the conversation around computing ethics using the hashtags #ACMCodeOfEthics and #IReadTheCode. And if you are not doing so already, please follow the @TheOfficialACM and @ACM_Ethics Twitter handles to share and engage with posts about the Code.  ACM also plans to host a Reddit AMA and Twitter chats on computing ethics in the weeks following this announcement. We will reach out to you again regarding these events when their details have been solidified.
Thank you in advance for helping to support and increase awareness of the ACM Code of Ethics and for promoting ethical conduct among computing professionals around the world.”

News From the ACM US Technology Policy Committee
The USACM has a new name. Please note the change and remember that SIGAI will continue to have a close relationship with the ACM US Technology Policy Committee. Here is a reminder of the purpose and goals: “The ACM US Technology Policy Committee is a leading independent and nonpartisan voice in addressing US public policy issues related to computing and information technology. The Committee regularly educates and informs Congress, the Administration, and the courts about significant developments in the computing field and how those developments affect public policy in the United States. The Committee provides guidance and expertise in varied areas, including algorithmic accountability, artificial intelligence, big data and analytics, privacy, security, accessibility, digital governance, intellectual property, voting systems, and tech law. As the internet is global, the ACM US Technology Policy Committee works with the other ACM policy entities on publications and projects related to cross-border issues, such as cybersecurity, encryption, cloud computing, the Internet of Things, and internet governance.”

The ACM US Technology Policy Committee’s New Leadership
ACM has named Prof. Jim Hendler as the new Chair of the ACM U.S. Technology Policy Committee (formerly USACM) under the new ACM Technology Policy Council. In addition to being a distinguished computer science professor at RPI, Jim has long been an active USACM member and has served as both a committee chair and as an at-large representative. This is a great choice to guide USACM into the future within ACM’s new technology policy structure. Please add individually to the SIGAI Public Policy congratulations to Jim. Our congratulations and appreciation go to outgoing Chair Stuart Shapiro for his outstanding leadership of USACM.

News from ACM SIGAI

We welcome ACM SIGAI China and its members to ACM SIGAI! ACM SIGAI China held its first event, the ACM SIGAI China Symposium on New Challenges and Opportunities in the Post-Turing AI Era, as part of the ACM Turing 50th Celebration Conference on May 12-14, 2017 in Shanghai. We will report details in an upcoming edition of AI Matters.

The winner of the ACM Prize in Computing is Alexei Efros from the University of California at Berkeley for his work on machine learning in computer vision and computer graphics. The award will be presented at the annual ACM Awards Banquet on June 24, 2017 in San Francisco.

We hope that you enjoyed the ACM Learning Webinar with Tom Mitchell on June 15, 2017 on “Using Machine Learning to Study Neural Representations of Language Meaning”. If you missed it, it is now available on “On Demand.”

The “50 Years of the ACM Turing Award” Celebration will be held on June 23 and 24, 2017 in San Francisco. The ACM SIGAI recipients of the ACM Turing Scholarship to attend this high-profile meeting are Tim Lee from Carnegie Mellon University and Justin Svegliato from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

ACM SIGAI now has a 3-month membership requirement before students who join ACM SIGAI can apply for financial benefits from ACM SIGAI, such as fellowships and travel support. Please help us with letting all students know about this new requirement to avoid any disappointments.